Master of Science in Supply Chain Management

Move learning into experience and advance your career.

Supply chains today are both local and global, and need to be dynamic, cost-effective and sustainable. This requires knowledgeable leaders to take the reins and offer innovative solutions to achieving more efficient supply chains.

In our master's program in Supply Chain Management, you’ll learn from industry leaders and leverage the six pillars of supply chain management (design, procurement, planning, manufacturing, logistics, and sustainability) to become a skilled problem-solver equipped with a broad, deep base of knowledge. Gain insight into a 21st century STEM approach to supply chain management that is unique to the field, while learning to leverage Six Sigma techniques to solve real supply chain problems.

With this degree, you will be ready to take on new leadership roles, drive larger projects, and help take your business to the next level through structured problem solving grounded in supply chain. Students pursuing this program will immediately add value to their organizations as they take on class projects that connect directly to their businesses.

This master’s degree is offered through the Daniels College of Business, Transportation Institute, and University College at the University of Denver, bridging world-class programs to increase your exposure to top leaders in industry and academia.

 

For more information on the Supply Chain Management master's program, visit the University College site.

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Course Listing

  • Core Courses
    • TRAN 4100 Fundamentals of Supply Chain Management
      • This course will provide a broad overview of the discipline of supply chain management, providing to students an understanding of "people, processes, and technologies" related to the field. Supply Chain Management is the discipline that brings together B2B and B2C markets, and the University of Denver's model defines this as an end to end system within six pillars that has a goal of a "cradle to cradle" system. Participants will learn of the key operating, financial, and technical measures and tools of supply chain management, which is necessary to be a successful professional in the field. Specific current and future trends will be covered, including the implications across local, national and global systems. The focus will be on learning and applying how supply chain will continue to transform in the future, but from an understanding of the end to end system and its principles as the foundation.

    • TRAN 4110 Fundamentals of Supply Chain Planning
      • According to the Six Pillars of Supply Chain program design at the University of Denver, the system can only succeed if it acts as an integrated system. This course focuses on the first three pillars of the supply chain management system, design, source, and schedule, the steps that are taken before a product is made. Supply Chain Planning is focused on how agents in the front end of the supply chain system are centered on how to create, procure, and plan/forecast within the overall process within and across companies. Students are exposed to concepts and practical examples of how front-end activities are achieved within the overall supply chain model. The course introduces concepts and tactics in product and supply chain design, strategic sourcing, forecasting, demand planning, and supplier management. Prerequisite: TRAN 4100.

    • TRAN 4120 Fundamentals of Supply Chain Execution
      • This course focuses on the final three pillars of the supply chain management system, make, deliver, and sustain, the steps that are taken as and after the product is made. Supply Chain Execution is focused on how agents in the back end of the supply chain system are centered on how to make, deliver and reuse within the overall process within and across companies. Students are exposed to concepts and practical examples of how back-end activities are achieved within the overall supply chain model. The course introduces concepts and tactics in materials resource planning (MRP), manufacturing, transportation, warehousing, distribution, retailing and sustainability. Upon completion of this course, the student will understand how these three pillars are critical to an overall successful supply chain strategy. The student will be introduced to how to apply these concepts and practical applications within a real-world market environment. Prerequisite: TRAN 4100.

    • TRAN 4130 Supply Chain Management Practicum
      • This course provides opportunities for students to apply concepts covered in the first three courses of the program to an individual project through the completion of a structured problem-solving exercise in an area of study related to the student’s specific area of interest. Potential topics will either relate to one of the six pillars in the SCM model, or a specific area of interest as a special topic, such as sustainable supply chains, supply chain structure, supply chain risk management, etc. Upon completion of this course, the student will possess a deeper understanding in an area of focus related to application of the student’s future interests. The student will be introduced to how this topic area can be applied in a company in a real market setting. Prerequisites: TRAN 4100, TRAN 4110, TRAN 4120.

    • TRAN 4140 Supply Chain Technology and Systems
      • The key to an effective supply chain are its people and processes, but technology and systems are often the glue that keeps everything together. Even since its inception, technology and systems have been critical to supply chain strategy; given the complexity and fast paced nature, it can be a key determinant of a company’s success or failure. Because technology is so rapidly changing, it is critical to understand how to develop a successful plan to enhance the overall supply chain strategy. In this course, we will not focus on a specific technology or system, but rather the fundamental concepts and how it intersects to people and processes. Specific technologies will be addressed, such as ERP, WMS, and TMS systems. As well, the course will focus on how a company’s strategy and business requirements should be developed into process flows, and a technology/system strategy. The course will also address how companies make technology and system solutions, as well as special topics related to supply chain strategy. Note that this course is only for a six class SCM certificate; it will need to be determined whether this course occurs before or after the SCM Practicum. TRAN 4100, 4110, 4120, 4130.

    • TRAN 4150 Supply Chain Cost Management
      • A successful supply chain strategy must be effective not just in its material flow within the six pillars and the information flow from its systems, but its financial flow as well. Companies and their corresponding supply chains can achieve improved cost management that leads to greater top line revenue growth through improvements in financial flows achieved waste reduction, inventory carrying cost, capital investment and management and terms with suppliers and customers, to name a few. How the financial flow of the company and its supply chain is dependent on the entity’s material and information flows, and vice versa. This course will provide an understanding of how these flows work in conjunction with one another, and how supply chain professionals must understand the role of financial management fundamentals in the process. Note that this course is only for a six class SCM certificate; it will need to be determined whether this course occurs before or after the SCM Practicum. Prerequisite: TRAN 4130.

    • TRAN 4160 Analytic Methods for Supply Chain Management
      • Because Supply Chain Management is built off of structured problem-solving techniques across suppliers and partners requiring rapid and precise decision making, analytical methods are a requirement for success. In this course, the student will be presented with advanced techniques in quantitative analytics that are critical for today’s largest companies and innovators. Upon completion of the course, the student will be familiar with how to apply these techniques under various situations across the supply chain and within the firm. Prerequisite: TRAN 4130.

    • TRAN 4170 Industrial Engineering and Operations Management
      • Industrial Engineering and Operations Management is the application of engineering, logistics, finance and analytics, and structured problem-solving techniques to achieve the goals of today’s global supply chains. In this course, the student will be introduced to the concept of Industrial Engineering, including critical methodologies such as Six Sigma, Lean, and the Toyota Production System. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to apply these structured problem-solving techniques to an advanced level across the six pillars of supply chain management. Prerequisite: TRAN 4100 & Advisor approval.

    • TRAN 4180 Sustainability and Supply Chain Management
      • Sustainability in Supply Chain Management is founded upon the principles of Six Sigma and Lean to not only reduce waste within the system, but also to solve some of the world’s greatest challenges in relation to the environment. Through an understanding of the supply chain across the six pillars and through the use of finance, industrial engineering, logistics, and analytics, the student will be capable of defining, measuring, analyzing and solving the balance required between industry and the environment. Prerequisite: TRAN 4100 or MKTG 4380.

    • TRAN 4190 Import/Export Supply Chain Management
      • Today's supply chain is global, and this means that companies must understand how to buy and sell goods across national boundaries. In this course, the strategic, operational, and tactical requirements of importing and exporting will be presented to the student in order to understand how the global supply chain operates. A specific focus will be on freight forwarding and customs requirements into and out of the U.S. territory through various ports and entry and egress. Prerequisites: TRAN 4130.

    • TRAN 4901 Capstone Project
      • The Capstone Project provides students the opportunity to research a topic, problem, or issue within their field of study, and work individually with a Capstone advisor. Similar in weight to a thesis, but more flexible, this final project will synthesize and apply core concepts acquired from the program. The student will select an appropriate Capstone advisor who is knowledgeable in the field of study to work closely with and whom can guide the research project. Evaluation will be focused on the quality and professionalism of applied research and writing; critical and creative thinking; problem-solving skills; knowledge of research design, method, and implementation; and contribution to the field and topic of study. Please see the Capstone Guidelines for additional details. Prerequisites: A Capstone Proposal that has been approved by both the Capstone Advisor and the Academic Director, acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. A final grade of a B- or better is required to pass. Prerequisite: Advisor approval.

    • OR
    • TRAN 4902 Capstone Seminar
      • The Capstone Seminar is a graduate seminar in which students utilize the knowledge and skills gained through the degree program to create a culminating work that critically addresses a problem in their degree field of study. The students produce a Capstone of 7000-8000 words that presents a position on a relevant problem, supports the position with professional and academic literature, analyzes and tests the proposed solution, and discusses the findings as related to the field of study. The seminar is dependent upon the quality, collegial discussion, and feedback of students’ research and work products, under the facilitation of a faculty member. The course structure guides the students through the process of independent, secondary research and writing of a Capstone. No primary research is allowed. Students generate the course content through ongoing discussion and peer feedback on the Capstone process and individual topic areas under investigation. Students professionally and academically communicate through written work and oral presentations. Students must have acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. A final grade of C or better is required in this course to meet degree requirements. Students must complete the Capstone Seminar in one quarter; no incomplete grades are assigned. Prerequisite: Advisor approval.

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Buffington

Jack Buffington

Assistant Professor of the Practice of Marketing; Director of Supply Chain Prog

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